ABOUT THE PLAN

#ReadTheBook is the Bible Reading plan we encourage everyone at Veritas to do together.

We want to be a people of the book. We want to make disciples who love God, love people, and advance the gospel, but that starts with us being disciples ourselves. Jesus said in Matthew 4:4, "Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God’” We need God’s word more than we need food every day.

We've found that reading the Bible in community with others helps you to actually stick with Bible Reading. We want to encourage you to do this plan with someone (your spouse, your family, your Community Group, a friend, your neighbor, etc.). Read from the plan each day and then talk about what God is teaching you with someone in person, on the phone, through text…even on Facebook.

Let’s #ReadTheBook together.

HOW TO USE THE PLAN

Following this plan will take you through the New Testament once in a year and the Old Testament once every three years. Here’s how the plan works:

New Testament — Read one chapter every weekday (Mon-Fri), by doing this you will read the entire NT in a year.

Old Testament — Read one chapter every weekday and one Psalm each Saturday, by doing this you will read the entire OT in three years.

What if I miss a day? — Our encouragement: Don’t try to play catch up for the days you’ve missed, just join us in reading on the day you’re able to start…or start again.

#READTHEBOOK INTRO VIDEOS

 

OLD TESTAMENT

 

GENESIS

Genesis means "beginning" so it is appropriately located at the very beginning of the bible. It details creation, the fall of man, and the beginning of God's plan of salvation.

 

EXODUS

The overarching theme of Exodus is the fulfillment of God’s promises to the patriarchs. The success of the exodus must be credited to the power and purpose of God, who remembers his promises, punishes sin, and forgives the repentant.

 

LEVITICUS

The book of Leviticus goes into deeper detail about the divine-human relationship put in place on Mount Sinai (Exodus 19–40). Leviticus assumes that Israel is sinful and impure, and it describes how to deal with sin and impurity so that the holy Lord can dwell among his people.

 

NUMBERS

Numbers tells of Israel’s journey from Mount Sinai to the borders of the promised land. Throughout the book we see the gradual fulfillment of the promises made to Abraham that his descendants would be God's people, and would occupy the land of Canaan. This book shows the reality of God’s presence with the people of Israel. As Israel disobeys, grumbles and complains, God demonstrates his love for them by preparing his people to enter the promised land.

 

DEUTERONOMY

Deuteronomy is largely a sermon, or set of sermons, preached by Moses to all of Israel shortly before his death. It is a motivational sermon, urging Israel’s faithful obedience to the covenant laws given 40 years previously at Sinai (Exodus 19–40).

 

JOSHUA

Joshua records part two of God’s grandest work of redemption in the OT period. In part one (the Penta­teuch), the Lord redeemed his people out of slavery in Egypt and formalized his covenantal love for them at Sinai. Moses led the people during that time. Now in part two, under the leadership of Joshua, the Lord brings his people into the Land of Promise and gives them rest.

 

THE PSALMS

The Psalms are a divinely inspired hymnbook written for the people of God so that they might sing in gathered worship of God. Because of Jesus' work we are now a part of God's family which means these songs and prayers are for us as well.

 

NEW TESTAMENT

 

THE GOSPEL OF MATTHEW

Matthew tells the story of Jesus of Nazareth, the long-expected Messiah who brought the kingdom of God to earth.

 

THE GOSPEL OF MARK

The ultimate purpose and theme of Mark’s Gospel is to present and defend Jesus’ universal call to discipleship.

 

THE GOSPEL OF LUKE

The gospel of Luke is Luke's account of God's plan of salvation through the life, death and resurrection of Jesus.

 

THE GOSPEL OF JOHN

The theme of John’s Gospel is that Jesus is the long-awaited, promised Messiah and Son of God. By believing in Jesus, people have eternal life (see John 20:30–31).

 

ACTS

The Book of Acts is part two of a two-volume set (Luke/Acts), continuing the story of the gospel of Jesus advancing through his church, by the power of the Holy Spirit.

 

ROMANS

Paul wrote Romans to unite the Jewish and Gentile Christians in Rome in the gospel. Paul longs for the Gentiles to become obedient Christians for the sake of Christ’s name. In the cross of Christ, God judges sin and at the same time shows his saving mercy. The ultimate goal of preaching the gospel is the glory of God.

 

1 & 2 CORINTHIANS

These are two of the four letters that Paul wrote to the Church in Corinth to address problems that were going on among them and refocus them on the gospel of Jesus.

 

GALATIANS

False teachers have convinced the Galatians that they are required to be circumcised. The result is division within their church (5:15). Paul gives numerous reasons why they should return to the simple truth of the gospel.

 

EPHESIANS

Ephesians offers general instruction in the truths of God’s redemptive work in Christ; the unity of the church among diverse peoples; and proper conduct in the church, the home, and the world.

 

 

PHILIPPIANS

Paul wrote to the Philippians from prison. He had several purposes in mind: to tell them that Epaphroditus had recovered from a serious illness; to encourage them in their faith; to assure them that he was still in good spirits; and to thank them for their continued support.

 

COLOSSIANS

Paul wrote to the Colossians to warn against this false teaching and to encourage the believers in their growth toward Christian maturity. He emphasizes Christ’s authority over all evil powers. Christians are united with the risen Christ, and therefore they share in his power and authority. Paul also encourages these believers to fight against sin, pursue holiness, and live as distinctively Christian households.

 

1 & 2 THESSALONIANS

Paul writes these letters to the Thessalonians because he helped plant this church on his missionary journey through Macedonia. These letters are to encourage and strengthen them in their hope in the gospel, and to snuff out some issues that they faced regarding the second coming of Jesus.

 

1 & 2 TIMOTHY

The theme of 1 Timothy is that the gospel leads to practical, visible change in believers’ lives. The true gospel, in contrast to false teaching, must and will always lead to godliness. In 2 Timothy Paul gives Timothy a bold, clear call to continue in the gospel despite suffering.

 

TITUS

he letter’s theme is the unbreakable link between faith and practice, belief and behavior. This truth is the basis for Paul’s criticism of false teaching, his instruction in Christian living, and standards he sets for church leaders.

 

PHILEMON

The theme of Paul’s letter is the power of the gospel to transform individual lives (v. 11) and human relationships (v. 16). Onesimus had experienced that transforming power in his life (“formerly he was useless” but “now he is indeed useful”; v. 11). Paul therefore urged his friend Philemon to form a new relationship with Onesimus, his runaway slave.

 

1 & 2 PETER

1 & 2 Peter was written to serve as a call to be full of hope to those who persevere in faith while suffering persecution. God’s grace in Christ truly transforms and empowers Christians to live righteously, despite opposition. The indwelling Holy Spirit produces virtuous qualities in followers of Christ. This results in fruitful lives.

 

1, 2, & 3 JOHN

John calls readers back to the three basics of Christian life: true doctrine, obedient living, and faithful devotion to Jesus.